Quote 6 Sep 3,049 notes
Life is a movie and you’re the star. Give it a happy ending.
— Joan Rivers, speaking in 1995. (via newyorker)
Photo 6 Sep 1,078 notes builtenvironment:

thisbigcity:

newurbanismfilmfestival:

Design vs human experience.

Sometimes the city tells you how it wants to be designed. Listen!

Studies of desire lines are, in my opinion, very important when looking at urban renewal and can even be filtered into fresh urban design.

builtenvironment:

thisbigcity:

newurbanismfilmfestival:

Design vs human experience.

Sometimes the city tells you how it wants to be designed. Listen!

Studies of desire lines are, in my opinion, very important when looking at urban renewal and can even be filtered into fresh urban design.

Photo 6 Sep 811 notes explore-blog:

For John Cage's birthday, 10 timeless rules for learning and life, created by Sister Corita Kent and popularized by Cage.

explore-blog:

For John Cage's birthday, 10 timeless rules for learning and life, created by Sister Corita Kent and popularized by Cage.

via Explore.
Photo 6 Sep 1,016 notes nprglobalhealth:

A Few Ebola Cases Likely In U.S., Air Traffic Analysis Predicts
It’s only a matter of time, some researchers are warning, before isolated cases of Ebola start turning up in developed nations, as well as hitherto-unaffected African countries.
The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than all previous outbreaks combined, the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The official count ;includes about 3,600 cases and 1,800 deaths across four countries.
Meanwhile, the authors of a new analysis say many countries — including the U.S. — should gear up to recognize, isolate and treat imported cases of Ebola.
The probability of seeing at least one imported case of Ebola in the U.S. is as high as 18 percent by late September, researchers reported Tuesday in the journal PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. That’s compared with less than 5 percent right now.
These predictions are based on the flow of airline passengers from West Africa and the difficulty of preventing an infected passenger from boarding a flight.
As with any such analysis, there’s some uncertainty. The range of a probable U.S. importation of Ebola by Sept. 22 runs from 1 percent to 18 percent. But with time — and a continuing intense outbreak in West Africa — importation is almost inevitable, the researchers told NPR.
"What is happening in West Africa is going to get here. We can’t escape that at this point," says physicist Alessandro Vespignani, the senior author on the study, who analyzes the spread of infectious diseases at Northeastern University.
Continue reading.
Image: Air traffic connections from West Africa to the rest of the world: While Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone don’t have many flights outside the region, Nigeria is well-connected to Europe and the U.S. (PLOS Currents: Outbreaks)

nprglobalhealth:

A Few Ebola Cases Likely In U.S., Air Traffic Analysis Predicts

It’s only a matter of time, some researchers are warning, before isolated cases of Ebola start turning up in developed nations, as well as hitherto-unaffected African countries.

The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa has killed more people than all previous outbreaks combined, the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The official count ;includes about 3,600 cases and 1,800 deaths across four countries.

Meanwhile, the authors of a new analysis say many countries — including the U.S. — should gear up to recognize, isolate and treat imported cases of Ebola.

The probability of seeing at least one imported case of Ebola in the U.S. is as high as 18 percent by late September, researchers reported Tuesday in the journal PLOS Currents: Outbreaks. That’s compared with less than 5 percent right now.

These predictions are based on the flow of airline passengers from West Africa and the difficulty of preventing an infected passenger from boarding a flight.

As with any such analysis, there’s some uncertainty. The range of a probable U.S. importation of Ebola by Sept. 22 runs from 1 percent to 18 percent. But with time — and a continuing intense outbreak in West Africa — importation is almost inevitable, the researchers told NPR.

"What is happening in West Africa is going to get here. We can’t escape that at this point," says physicist Alessandro Vespignani, the senior author on the study, who analyzes the spread of infectious diseases at Northeastern University.

Continue reading.

Image: Air traffic connections from West Africa to the rest of the world: While Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone don’t have many flights outside the region, Nigeria is well-connected to Europe and the U.S. (PLOS Currents: Outbreaks)

via NPR.
Photo 6 Sep 18,370 notes newyorker:

Remembering Joan Rivers, in today’s daily cartoon.

newyorker:

Remembering Joan Rivers, in today’s daily cartoon.

Photo 6 Sep 112 notes
Photo 6 Sep 341 notes newyorker:

Months before the U.S. Geological Survey released a study on Yellowstone’s supervolcano, fears of another eruption had already gone viral. George Black writes:

“Doomsday predictions like this have been around for millennia. But their purveyors have never had social media before, and this time their prediction—at least of something significant, if not of a supervolcano eruption—almost came true. At dawn on March 30th, Yellowstone had a 4.8-magnitude earthquake, its biggest in thirty-four years.”

Photograph by Max Waugh/Solent News/AP

newyorker:

Months before the U.S. Geological Survey released a study on Yellowstone’s supervolcano, fears of another eruption had already gone viralGeorge Black writes:

“Doomsday predictions like this have been around for millennia. But their purveyors have never had social media before, and this time their prediction—at least of something significant, if not of a supervolcano eruption—almost came true. At dawn on March 30th, Yellowstone had a 4.8-magnitude earthquake, its biggest in thirty-four years.”

Photograph by Max Waugh/Solent News/AP

Photo 26 Jul 256 notes newyorker:

Richard Brody on Luc Besson’s new film, “Lucy”: http://nyr.kr/1rj9ouG

“There’s no problem with the movie’s pulp-fiction essence; the problem is that almost all of Besson’s formidable imagination went into the science-fiction concept and the magnificent computer-graphic realization of it, and very little of that brain power went into the ordinary framework.”


Still want to see it…

newyorker:

Richard Brody on Luc Besson’s new film, “Lucy”: http://nyr.kr/1rj9ouG

“There’s no problem with the movie’s pulp-fiction essence; the problem is that almost all of Besson’s formidable imagination went into the science-fiction concept and the magnificent computer-graphic realization of it, and very little of that brain power went into the ordinary framework.”

Still want to see it…

Photo 9 Jul 162 notes npr:

“In ‘Little Engine That Could,’ Some See An Early Feminist Hero" via Elizabeth Blair
Was “I think I can” the great-grandmother of “lean in?” Some readers see the plucky locomotive as a parable about working women, but some versions of the story feature a male protagonist instead.
Image: Platt & Munk, Penguin Young Readers Group

I think I can…

npr:

In ‘Little Engine That Could,’ Some See An Early Feminist Hero" via Elizabeth Blair

Was “I think I can” the great-grandmother of “lean in?” Some readers see the plucky locomotive as a parable about working women, but some versions of the story feature a male protagonist instead.

Image: Platt & Munk, Penguin Young Readers Group

I think I can…

via NPR.
Video 9 Jul 2,201 notes

rachelignotofsky:

Can you hear the ocean? Originally these Galapagos island animals were illustrated for the awesome non-profit Phylo Games for their Darwin deck of playing cards.

Now they are also available to you as an art prints here: https://www.etsy.com/listing/193280227/galapagos-sea-life-art-print-deal?ref=shop_home_active_1

via NPR.

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